Truyện Ma Có Thật Lời nói đầu tiên gửi đến các bạn . Đây là trang web truyện ma có thật được sưu tầm từ nhiều nguồn trên mạng . Tại TruyenMaCoThat.Net các bạn có thể Doc Truyen Ma và Nghe Truyen Ma cực kỳ rùng rợn. Được những nhân chứng sống kẻ lại mang đậm tính ma quái Việt Nam. buc anh ky quai 2 Truyen ma Co That Ma là một khái niệm trừu tượng, một phần phi vật chất của một người đã chết (hay hiếm hơn là một động vật đã chết). Theo quan niệm của một số tôn giáo và nền văn hóa, con người gồm thể xác (mang tính vật chất) và linh hồn (mang tính phi vật chất). Khi thể xác chết, linh hồn xuất khỏi thể xác. Nếu linh hồn đó không có cơ hội đầu thai hoặc nơi trú ngụ chung với các linh hồn khác mà tương tác với cõi thực có con người sẽ gọi là “ma”, “hồn ma”, “quỷ”; nhưng nếu các phần phi vật chất đó tương tác với cõi thực của con người theo tình cảm, theo trách nhiệm được giao của các tôn giáo thì lại gọi là “hồn”, “linh hồn”, “thánh”, “thần”, “thiên sứ” . Và khi Doc Truyen Ma và Nghe Truyen Ma của TruyenMaCoThat.Net các bạn nhớ là nó chỉ mang tính chất giải trí thôi nhé các bạn đừng nên tín quá nhiều cũng như cố gắng tìm mọi cách để nhìn thấy ma nhé thật không tốt chút nào ??? . Chúc các bạn có những phút giây giải trí thật sử thoải mái cùng với TruyenMaCoThat.Net Truyen Ma Co That – Doc Truyen Ma Co That – Nghe Truyen Ma Co That miễn phí tại TruyenMaCoThat.net truyen ma nguyen ngoc ngan truyen ma kinh di mystoningtongarden.com

New construction funds to be available in Connecticut

The New London Day reports the State of Connecticut Bond Commission has approved $291 million in bond allocations that will result in construction work in Southeastern Connecticut for public housing projects.  This is welcome news for area contractors and workers dealing with a tight economy.  Contractors should make certain they are ready to bid on projects as they are funded by having all their organizational paperwork in order including insurance and contracts.  This is a good opportunity for contractors to explore and I will post more information as it becomes available.


Divorce — Does it Matter Who Files First?

A new article on Forbes.com by Attorney Jeff Landers gives a nice overview of the reasons to gear up early once you sense that divorce may be one outcome of your marital problems.

While Jeff seems to suggest that divorce dirty tricks are the exclusive province of men, in our experience the risks and considerations he outlines in this otherwise informative article apply to both genders.

Landers points out that consulting an attorney early can not only provide you with a crucial checklist for contingency planning, but can also assure that your spouse won’t beat you to the punch by consulting several of the best area lawyers simply to disqualify them from representing you.  He also notes that starting the action assures that if the matter goes to trial down the road, you will be the one, as the plaintiff, to present your case first.

Our clients in Connecticut should also know that by filing for divorce certain Automatic Orders take effect the moment the divorce papers are served on their spouse. These orders prevent the other party from doing a number of things including moving out-of-state with children, hiding assets, taking sole ownership of joint assets, changing locks on the marital residence, changing beneficiaries on existing insurance policies and more.  The full text and a summary of the Automatic Orders can be found here on the Connecticut Judicial Website.

Bottom line? While you’re hoping for the best and working on your marriage it also makes sense to prepare well for the worst


Groups in Southeast Connecticut to Shine a Light on Domestic Violence

At 7:00 PM On April 4, 2013, a number of area groups including  Safe Futures (Formerly the Women’s Center of Southeast Connecticut) , The Rose Conrad Foundation,  and Hadassah American Affairs of Eastern Connecticut  will come together at Three Rivers Community College in Norwich,  to present a program about the problem of domestic violence and the resources available to victims.  The program entitled The Power of Purple – An End to Domestic Violence will feature resource tables, a short film and a presentation by keynote speaker, Gena Barreca, humorist, author, and professor of Women’s Studies at the University of Connecticut.

The program is free and open to the public.  If you or anyone you know is affected by domestic violence or if you just want to learn more and do your part to recognize and prevent domestic violence, please attend.

To read more about what’s in the news here and around the world read this great post What’s Love Got to Do With it: Violence at Home by blogger and  family lawyer Sherri Donovan.


Absolutely true.

NBC Latino

Regardless of how one feels about the sequestration debate – either it’s a terrible example of heartless partisan gridlock or a tough but necessary path to fiscal discipline – the reality is that the automatic cuts expected in different areas of government spending are already having an impact.

“We have lost about 20 employees through sequestration,” said Raymond Lopez, Jr., president and CEO of Engineering Services Network (ESN), one of the top Latino-owned companies in Virginia. ESN is an engineering and technology company which does contract work for the Department of Defense.  In anticipation of cuts, Lopez’ customers have cut back on orders, resulting in the layoffs.

“This is a sad commentary on our ability to govern in this country by our elected representatives,” said Lopez. “If everything is done by knee-jerk reaction, we are going to hurt our sons and daughters who are our war fighters right now,” remarked…

View original post 421 more words


Saw this post this morning.
Wondering what my clients and neighbors in Stonington and surrounds think


Connecticut Appellate Court Underscores Limits on Making Alimony and Child Support Non-Modifiable

In a decision released this week, the Connecticut Appellate court once more addressed the issue of whether and to what extent a divorcing couple can agree to make child support and alimony  non-modifiable.  It has long been clear that absent clear and unambiguous written language to the contrary, both alimony and child support may be changed by the court as the circumstances of the parties change.  This language is normally found in the terms of a written separation agreement, i.e., a contract, between the parties which is adopted by the court at the time of the dissolution and made a court order.

Historically, it has been easier to put a lock on an alimony award than on a child support award for reasons of public policy. The courts have always ruled that only under certain very limited circumstances may the parties to a divorce limit the rights of their children to receive support from their parents.

This week’s decision in Malpeso vs Malpeso involved a situation where the husband was to pay $20,000 per month to the wife as” alimony, or separate support for the  minor children” .  The ambiguity of that language alone, stated in the disjunctive, made the agreement unusual.  The agreement went on to provide that this sum, which it now referred to as simply “alimony” would not be modifiable for 8 years.  An exception the parties had agreed on  as part of the contract was a calamitous circumstance affecting the economy of New York and similar to the events of September 11, 2001.  Clearly such an event had not occurred.  Still, the husband argued that his circumstances had changed.

In response to her former husband’s motion to modify the order before the 8 years had expired, the wife objected citing the language of the agreement and the trial court agreed.  The appellate court reversed saying the agreement was ambiguous as to whether by “alimony” the parties meant to refer to the order that the agreement had earlier characterized to include child support.  Based on that ambiguity, the court held that the longstanding presumption favoring the modifiability of child support prevailed.

In an earlier post, we discussed another recent case in which the parties had agreed, at the time of the divorce, on an ending date for alimony.  In that case, the court held that selecting a termination date alone did not make alimony non-modifiable as to term.  Both of these cases underscore the need for careful drafting of agreements regarding both alimony and child support.  In the event of any ambiguity at all, the courts do not look to the original intent of the parties, but instead to the  policies that favor modification.


Changing Your Name? A Dilemma for Divorcing Women

nametagWriting this month for the New York Times, Megan Wood speaks of divorce as an opportunity for women to create a new identity — a trend that is, apparently, gaining some traction.

The idea of name reinvention after divorce was popularized by Cheryl Strayed in her riveting memoir, “Wild — From Lost to Found on the Pacific Coast Trail.”  The author, born Cheryl Nyland, explains that she needed a meaningful new name after her divorce and, rather than opting to return to her birth name, chose one that fit her history.  Cheryl had, she freely admits, strayed. While we question whether most women would find comfort in such a decision — query, can one be passive-agressive toward one’s self? —  still the issue of what name to carry forward is one most divorcing women confront.

For most of us, the question is whether we are most comfortable identifying ourselves as we have  throughout the years of our marriage, perhaps as the mother of our children — maybe from a prior marriage — or as our father’s daughter. The option of  adopting a brand new name is a more radical notion.

The options are not quite as open for women divorcing in Connecticut as Wood reports them to be in New York.  Outside of divorce, any Connecticut citizen may apply for a name change in Connecticut courts and, as long as there is no intent to defraud creditors or others, the application will ordinarily be granted. However the free no-fuss name-change option available in family court for divorcing women is limited. Under  the family law statute on the subject, you may only elect to resume a birth name or other former name, not a new one.

I’d be remiss in not acknowledging that the name change statute applies to men as well. However, typically this means simply dropping the part of a hyphenated name  that already included his birth name — hardly as traumatic a decision as that faced by women.